Michael Pascoe
Michael Pascoe
Michael Pascoe
Michael Pascoe

Obituary of Michael Alvin Pascoe

Michael Alvin Pascoe VIEWER WARNING: Only PATRIOTIC Grown-Ups may be able to handle the following… Son, brother, cousin, uncle, husband, father, grandfather, great grand pop pop, coach, patriot, dog lover, music aficionado & friend to many… Michael Alvin Pascoe (Born April 27th, 1943) passed away in his Lake County home on November 18th, 2020, from a sudden heart attack. He was the only son of Thornley Alvin Pascoe and Betty Lois Hamilton and brother to three sisters… Judith Usher (husband: Hugh), Donna Bickel (husband: Carl), and Debra Commons (husband: Dan). He was an uncle and substitute father figure to a plethora of nieces (Cheryl, Beth, Janice, Jennifer, Sonya, Tamara, Alexa & Teresa). Husband to Jeanette Pascoe and father to Michael A. Pascoe (wife: Sylvia) and Meredith A. Noyer (husband: Jon). Grand-papa to Joseph Denier, Justin Noyer, Brodie McCarthy (wife: Amanda), Brendon McCarthy (wife: Jamie) and Kieron McCarthy (wife: Fallon). Great grand pop pop to Melanie McCarthy, Theodore McCarthy and a soon to be arriving great granddaughter. He was a “Friend” to almost all who knew him… Born in Sacramento California, one may have thought young Michael would have turned to a life of crime in his adulthood, for he was known to steal cans of black olives out of the pantry and eat them under his bed. He eventually grew out of that type of nefarious behavior and ended up being a world class Special Agent for the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS). In the time span between his days of larceny and the final days spent on “his mountain”, Mike’s life was full of adventure. “The Animal”, as he was called while attending Encina High School, excelled at wrestling, track and was one of the star players on the football team. Even with a full schedule of classes and playing sports, he somehow also found time to participate in a singing group and (according to him) attempt to impress the members of the opposite sex with his many talents. After Graduation, Michael went on to attend American River College, Humboldt State University and San Jose State University, where he continued to play football, wrestle, work in a lumber mill and tend bar. As international events ramped up overseas, he enlisted in the Navy (one week before a scout from the San Francisco 49’ers notified him they wanted him to show up to training camp… a path he always wondered where it may have led). While in the Navy, he was assigned to San Diego, El Centro, Exmouth Australia (where he met Jeanette) and one final deployment upon the aircraft carrier: USS Ranger. Upon completion of his Navy commitment in 1970, he returned to California and married Jeanette. He immediately went back to school and applied for multiple peace officer positions. It didn’t take long before he was hired as a deputy sheriff for the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Department in 1971. On his first day of the job as a solo deputy, he “earned” a safe driving award from his co-workers for completely destroying a patrol vehicle while investigating the burglary of a 10-speed bicycle via a doggie door (contact his son for more details on that little incident). While he was working shifts as a patrol deputy during the night, he attended more courses at Sacramento State University and Golden Gate University during the day, respectively earning both Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in Criminal Justice and Public Administration. He even managed to find time to help bring his son and daughter into the world. After almost 5 years of fun and games with the Sheriff’s Department and earning the nickname of “Deputy Mustache” by the local constituency, Michael decided a life of world travel and adventure would be just the ticket for him and his family, so he applied for the then named “Naval Investigative Service” to fight crime (and communism) around the world. He was hired in 1976 and began his career at the Treasure Island field office in San Francisco. After a short assignment there, his next tour took him and his family to Okinawa in 1979. While in Okinawa, he became a Third Degree Mason (like his father before him) and a Shriner, he joined a power-lifting team (setting at least one lifting record that lasted for years on “the island”), obtained his scuba certification and worked diligently with local law enforcement agencies to combat both military and international crimes taking place on and around the islands of Okinawa and Japan. In 1982, he and his family moved to LaPlata MD where he was assigned to NIS Headquarters, in Washington D.C. He helped re-write and update NIS’s firearm and use of force programs, was involved in the weapon and defensive tactics training (aka: NIS-Fu) at the NIS Academy and was known to occasionally “toss” a cadet or two around on the first day of class. In 1986, after his tenure as an instructor at the academy, he was tasked with another overseas assignment (likely due to complaints from a few recently bruised young agents). This time, he and his family would move to Keflavik, Iceland. While in Keflavik, he quickly befriended a number of local law enforcement officials and started investigating crimes, organizing and running protective service details and participating in Cold War counter-surveillance work (details that can’t be printed here, but let’s just say he had a number of opportunities to don his leather “Spy vs. Spy” cloak and “Inspector Clouseau” hat). He played an integral role in the security planning for the historic Reagan/Gorbachev summit in 1987. In 1988, he and his family made their final journey to Benicia, California. While always adhering to the mantra of “KEEP IT FUN”, he worked undercover stings, organized more international protective service details and ultimately retired as the Assistant Regional Director of the western United States. Not one to just ride off into the sunset, he immediately started coaching the local high school JV football and wrestling teams, ran the Benicia High School boosters club, created a private consultation and firearms training business and bought a Harley Davidson. The purchase of the motorcycle and his love of the public service community eventually melded into what would become his second family, the Iron Warrior Motorcycle Club. He was given the moniker “BuffaloMan” based on a comment about his size made years ago by a fellow NIS agent and even more so, because of his resemblance to the shaggy bovine. He eventually became president of the East Bay Chapter, where he helped recruit more public safety personnel to join the club, thus expanding his second family to many other parts of the country. In 2003, he moved to Lake County where he bought a house in the hills on 18 acres so he could be close to his son and daughter (and their families), both of whom had also followed in his law enforcement footsteps. He rode and partied with his newest brothers and sisters, rang the “Pascoe Family” cowbell at his grandkid’s football games, volunteered with the local sheriff’s department as a Range Safety Officer and member of the Disaster Aid Response Team (DART), became a member of the Konocti Road & Gun Club, went camping and fishing when he could and hung out with his dogs. He rode his motorcycle as much as he could until age caught up with him and he couldn’t ride any longer. Although he didn’t attend church on a regular basis, he was never far from one of the many family Bibles he had strategically placed throughout his home. He doted on his grandchildren and encouraged them to become solid citizens of this Constitutional Federal Republic, to study and understand the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights and to be courteous whenever possible. One of his only regrets in life was that he didn’t spend enough time running out the “commies” within our own borders, but then again, during the time he was operational, he was under the belief that those “other” agencies with three letter acronyms would have been all over it (you “suits” had to know that was coming). No matter, he knew his patriotic genes had been passed down successfully when on one occasion a couple of years ago, his youngest grandson returned home from school complaining that his 4thgrade teacher had been spouting socialist drivel all day. This provided him comfort in knowing there may be actual “hope” for the future of the country he loved so much. Mike cherished and often spoke lovingly about his family, fellow athletes, the athletes he coached, close friends and co-workers and about the adventures they had all shared together. Although he was a sailor and admired all veterans, he had a tremendous amount of respect for Marines, taking their motto “Semper Fi” to heart. Mike strove to live his life with honor, valor and truth. He was grateful for having had the opportunity to meet and interact with so many quality people in his life who had left a positive impact on him. His only hope was that he may be remembered as fondly as his memories and feelings were of them. Anyhow (a word Mike used regularly to let you know he was about to wrap up a conversation)… If you’re so inclined, turn on ZZ Top’s “La Grange”, sit back with a cigar, pour yourself a couple fingers of your favorite bourbon and reminisce back to all of the good times you spent with “Big Mike, the Animal, BuffaloMan…”, he’ll be sitting there right next to you, smiling and enjoying the moment. He will be interred with his parents at the Sacramento Valley National Cemetery, in Dixon California, sometime early next year (we are shooting for April 27th). Any donations can be made to: Warrior Foundation Freedom Station or your local Shriner’s Hospital for Children. PS: Dad wanted everyone to know that if his name were to someday show up on a ballot with a vote for a democrat candidate, it would be the most solid evidence of voter fraud ever available. PPS: If you were offended by anything in this obituary, Mike would’ve said (while patting you on the head), “It’s all right snowflake, you’ll be okay…. winter’s coming.” PPPS: Dad enjoyed black olives to the very end, but we think he missed the challenge of sneaking them out of the pantry. PPPPS: Mike’s family sincerely appreciates all of the condolences, cards, well wishes and offers of support from friends, family and those folks who have expressed sadness at hearing the news of his passing. We have also enjoyed the stories you have shared with us as to how he impacted your life. Thank you.
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